Little Free Library #6267, Tacoma

imageWooHoo! Two Little Free Libraries in a row. Tacoma has a couple of dozen Little Free Libraries which were part of the Little Free Library Project. This Little Free Library was created by a grandfather/granddaughter team is located on the south side of N. 22nd between North Hudson Street and North Ferdinand Street.

This “Little Free Library” is unusual in that it has a two toned blue paint job and some kind of sports boards attached to the side. Inside there are over a dozen books.

Little Free Libraries is part of a community movement which offers free books. When I considered my first Little Free Library in November 2012, a Wikipedia article informed me that there were over 200 of these libraries. There are now over 15,000!  Each of the libraries is registered and can be located by their GPS coordinates. Per the November 2012 website:

Our Mission

  • To promote literacy and the love of reading by building free book exchanges worldwide.
  • To build a sense of community as we share skills, creativity, and wisdom across generations
  • To build more than 2,510 libraries around the world – more than Andrew Carnegie–and then more. (yes, they made that one!)

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Little Free Library #16986, Lakewood

19256413431_e5b9895279_kBack in November of 2012, Tacoma had two little free library, which were part of the Little Free Library Project. Now there must be a couple of dozen little free libraries and Lakewood, WA has two.

This “Little Free Library” is located at 10317 Interlaaken Drive SW, Lakewood, WA. It is unusual in that it is attached to a tree stump and has a darling dragonfly handle. Inside there are about a dozen books, but none for me today.

Little Free Libraries is part of a community movement which offers free books. When I considered my first Little Free Library in November 2012, a Wikipedia article informed me that there were over 200 of these libraries. There are now over 15,000!  Each of the libraries is registered and can be located by their GPS coordinates. Per the November 2012 website:

Our Mission

  • To promote literacy and the love of reading by building free book exchanges worldwide.
  • To build a sense of community as we share skills, creativity, and wisdom across generations
  • To build more than 2,510 libraries around the world – more than Andrew Carnegie–and then more. (yes, they made that one!)

 

Skookum Wulge Beach Habitat Restoration

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Driving home from Brown’s Point the other day, I stopped to admire the view along Marine View Drive. The information sign told me that I was enjoying the Skookum Wulge Beach Habitat Restoration, a 1.19 acre parcel of uplands and tidelands of Commencement Bay that had previously been the Meeker Log Storage lease. When the lease expired in 1999, the property was purchased and the title conveyed to the Puyallup Tribe. The site was renamed to Skookum Wulge, which translates to powerful salt water. There are two other sites in this project, Yowkwala and Squally Beach. For more information on the Skookum Wulge, go here.

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Cafe Vincero

imageToday  I enjoyed an impulsive lunch with my good friend. We went to a new to us place, Cafe Vincero at 714 Pacific Avenue in Tacoma. The Cafe  pictures Italian dining and specializes in wood fired pizza. The space is lovely with the abundant tile working well with the historic building. Our waiter was attentive and funny! Because of a tiny mix up, which was graciously handled, we ended up with two pizzas.  They were both delicious. Really, they were so good I would happily go back tomorrow!

The building is known as the Kaufman-Wolff Building and was constructed in 1888 with Farrell & Darmer being the architects. Occupants have included: Sperry & Spengemann, G.L. Holmes Furniture, Wallerstein Candies, Edwin Chambers Auto Supplies, Soldiers & Sailors Club House, War Camp Community Service, Edward B. Rhodes Post – American Legion, Sutherland Tire Co., B. Wingard &
Sons Butchers’ Supply Co., United Service Organization (U.S.O.) and the Footprinters’ Club (seriously, what is a Footprinters’s Club?!). As of May 2014, the Vincero was in place on the Pacific Avenue level of the building.

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U.S. Soldiers Home Cemetery

soldiers home cemetery

soldiers home cemetery

The Washington Soldiers Home Cemetery in  Orting, Washington is associated with the nearby Washington Soldiers Home.  There are 2,683 interments. The soldiers that are buried here fought in the Civil War through the Vietnam War and sometimes have wives and mothers buried next to them. While most of the soldiers are men, there are some women also.

Four of the soldiers are Civil War Congressional medal of honor recipients. They are George L Houghton, Alexander U. McHale, Albert O’Connor, and William Sickles (pictured).

For more information on this cemetery, you should go visit the real wonderful associated Facebook Page. The photos below also include one of Mt. Rainier from downtown Orting.

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Tacoma’s Liberty Bell

17666669973_a11e74dbdd_kOn Saturday I was exploring the Museum District in Tacoma and we stopped to take a group photo near Union Station. A delightful security guard stopped to offer to take a photo with all of us in it. And then he told us about the often overlooked Liberty Bell in Tacoma. It is located down a staircase next to Union Station and tucked around the corner. It is available for ringing and makes a lovely tone.

Tacoma Weekly did a great article on how the bell got there.

17707234784_f8767647d6_kWant to hear it ring? IMG_0588

Ryan Sawmill in 1888, Sumner, WA

18061225915_207d7c2b1c_oIn 1990, artist Paul Cislo painted three murals on walls in downtown Sumner to commemorate Sumner’s Centennial which occurred in 1991. This Cislo mural on Main Street is titled Ryan Sawmill in 1888, (Sumner, WA) and illustrates a sawmill and loggers on Elhi Hill. George Ryan, who owned the mill, was an important person in Sumner’s history.

The Sumner Mural Restoration Project is raising funds to restore all three murals. This summer Trackside Pizza will move into the building.

I stopped here after a Holiday BBQ. While snapping my photos my dear husband wandered into an antique store and purchased two chairs, so this was an expensive stop for me!

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Pecchenino Garden in Gig Harbor

17843868769_feeeff42ca_kSmithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Gardens has the Pecchenino Garden in Gig Harbor registered as a Horticultural Services Division Garden and today it was open to the public for a small donation which was contributed to a charity. The two acre garden surrounds a private house and is amazing. The garden features a stupendous view of Henderson Bay and Cutts Island, a waterfall, a vegetable garden and, of course, flowers.

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The dock at Thea’s Park

17750315512_5f858f945a_o(1)Thea Park hosted dragon boat races today and dear husband and I managed to see the very end of it. Not the racing part, but there was still a group receiving awards and a booth or two. I wandered on to the dock to see the new still dragon boats, their dragon heads being safely stowed.

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Velodrome at Marymoore Park

17473898391_3f8d33bc41_kWashington State’s only velodrome (a cycle-racing track, typically with steeply banked curves) is the Velodrome at Marymoore Park in Redmond, WA. Dear husband and I checked it out today. There were only a couple of folks causally biking the loop on this lovely day. Velodrome racing was a popular sport in the U.S from the early 1800s to the 1930s and has been a part of the Olympic Games since 1896. There are about 26 functioning velodromes across the country. Interesting fact, the bicycles that race the track can go speeds of upward of 50 mph and have no brakes.

While at Marymoore, we also checked out the spectacular rock climbing wall and the turn of the century Windmill in the Willowmoor farmstead area.

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