Tag Archives: mural

John Wilks Booth may have lived in Granbury, TX

imageCatching up from the Texas trip

There is some debate on the fate of John Wilks Booth. Most say he was killed by Federal soldiers who had tracked him down at the Garrett Farm.

But the more interesting theory is that the wrong man was killed at Garrett Farm, Booth escaped to Granbury, TX, changed his name to John St. Helen and tended bar in what is now the Nutshell Cafe. While extremely sick, St. Helen made a death bed confession, but then he recovered. Since his story was then out there, he needed to leave town. He went to Enid, Oklahoma where he committed suicide. A book, Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth by Finis Bates, was written about this (that part is for sure true). Bates later gained control of St. Helen/Booth’s body and exhibited in carnival sideshows.

So, that explains where there is a mural featuring John Wilks Booth next to his wanted poster and near a picture of Lincoln. The mural also features the Lady in Red, who was suppose to be the love of Booth’s life. And on the other wall is Davy Crockett. The Nutshell Cafe is reportedly haunted by the Lady in Red with her boyfriend, Booth, supposedly haunts the adjacent Granbury Opera House.

On a lighter note, I found the coffee to be good at the Nutshell Cafe and would be glad to go back to try the ice cream.

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Ryan Sawmill in 1888, Sumner, WA

18061225915_207d7c2b1c_oIn 1990, artist Paul Cislo painted three murals on walls in downtown Sumner to commemorate Sumner’s Centennial which occurred in 1991. This Cislo mural on Main Street is titled Ryan Sawmill in 1888, (Sumner, WA) and illustrates a sawmill and loggers on Elhi Hill. George Ryan, who owned the mill, was an important person in Sumner’s history.

The Sumner Mural Restoration Project is raising funds to restore all three murals. This summer Trackside Pizza will move into the building.

I stopped here after a Holiday BBQ. While snapping my photos my dear husband wandered into an antique store and purchased two chairs, so this was an expensive stop for me!

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Beyond the Bluff, Beneath the Bay

mural corner 2“Beyond the Bluff, Beneath the Bay”, by Janice Lee Warren is part of the Tacoma Murals Project. More work by Ms. Warren can be found here. It was painted this year along Stadium Way and replace another mural that had been in place. That mural, featuring sailboats on the bay, had been extensively tagged. The house shown represents the home of “Skookum” Smith who made history by bringing the Northern Pacific rails into Tacoma just one day before the line’s charter expired. While I was out and about, I noticed the mountain was out 🙂

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Viking Ship Mural

15897521359_44e6d43f4c_kWhile Poulsbo was indeed settled primarily by Norwegians and other Scandinavian immigrants, sadly the Vikings did not make an appearance. But perhaps now they have through James R. Mayo’s humongous mural on Boehm’s Chocolates on Front Street. The mural was painted in 2011. I was surprised to learn that until World War II Norwegian was the dominate language in Poulsbo.

While visiting the small city for a seasonal day trip, I also captured a few Christmas photos.

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No One Else But You Can Feel Along the Grooves

muralI wandered off to revisit the lovely leaf mural on S. 43rd Street (310 East 43rd Street). But it was gone! Of course the bridge is still there, but there is a new mural. I had to consider it a while before I decided that although it was very different from the leaf mural, I really like it. My first impression when I drove over the bridge, is that it was swirls of colors, but when I took the time to get out of the car, I realized that it was words that said “No One Else But You Can Feel Along the Grooves”. The mural was created in 2013 by David Long.

To see the previous mural, go here.

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Mural at Last Stop Computers

12376192514_e1961b2c1e_bThere is a great mural wrapped around the lot of Last Stop Computers, 3101 Sixth Avenue. It features Mt. Rainer. There is also one of those dear carved bears welcoming visitors.

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Parkland Mural

MuralThere is a Ed Kane mural next to the blue house at 412 Garfield Street. The house is echoed in the mural and there is also a white house and a brick building that I assume are original to the neighborhood. More information about the mural can be found here.

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Red Mural on Barrier Blocks

11914588524_de7eff5609_bOne has to look hard for the mural on the barrier blocks at 5699 Pipeline Road East, Tacoma. But they are worth the Eastside search with their bold, red color and jaunty graphics. My favorite barrier (if one can have a favorite barrier) is the one with the word ‘Adventure’ on it! The artists are Natalie Oswald, K. Candejas, Y. Simone and J. Warren. The Tacoma Murals Project mural was created in 2012. The top photo shows the barriers as they sit and the bottom photo shows them Photoshopped side by side.

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Hing Hay Park, Seattle

11765614935_c04a82fe90_bHing Hay Park at 423 Maynard Ave S. is a vital part of Seattle’s International District. The name translates to “Park for Pleasurable Gatherings”. The pagoda, or Grand Pavilion, was constructed in Taipei, Taiwan in 1974. The mural facing the park shows an elaborate dragon. When I visited there was a group of men playing chess on the over-sized chess board and others were playing ping pong.

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