Tag Archives: restoration

Skookum Wulge Beach Habitat Restoration


Driving home from Brown’s Point the other day, I stopped to admire the view along Marine View Drive. The information sign told me that I was enjoying the Skookum Wulge Beach Habitat Restoration, a 1.19 acre parcel of uplands and tidelands of Commencement Bay that had previously been the Meeker Log Storage lease. When the lease expired in 1999, the property was purchased and the title conveyed to the Puyallup Tribe. The site was renamed to Skookum Wulge, which translates to powerful salt water. There are two other sites in this project, Yowkwala and Squally Beach. For more information on the Skookum Wulge, go here.

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Ryan Sawmill in 1888, Sumner, WA

18061225915_207d7c2b1c_oIn 1990, artist Paul Cislo painted three murals on walls in downtown Sumner to commemorate Sumner’s Centennial which occurred in 1991. This Cislo mural on Main Street is titled Ryan Sawmill in 1888, (Sumner, WA) and illustrates a sawmill and loggers on Elhi Hill. George Ryan, who owned the mill, was an important person in Sumner’s history.

The Sumner Mural Restoration Project is raising funds to restore all three murals. This summer Trackside Pizza will move into the building.

I stopped here after a Holiday BBQ. While snapping my photos my dear husband wandered into an antique store and purchased two chairs, so this was an expensive stop for me!

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Mill Creek Earthworks Park

8701045748_4395d4cdd1_b(1)On Wednesday I was in Kent and stopped to enjoy the day at Mill Creek Earthworks Park at 742 East Titus, Kent, WA. It was a lovely day and there were baby ducks! The park had good and bad to it.

The Good:

  • It was designed by Bauhaus Master, Herbert Bayer.
  • It is a very cool storm water detention system and designed to handle a 10,000 year flood.
  • It looks like a place that hobbits would live in.
  • The restrooms have delightful art on them.
  • It is part of a restoration project.
  • It connects to other Earthworks Project.
  • Plenty of free parking.
  • It was recently restored.
  • Did I mention the baby ducks? You can see them crossing the trail on the photo above.

The Bad:

  • The toilets in the women’s room don’t have doors and I really like doors.
  • The trail was closed, so I didn’t try to go down it.
  • There was a homemade cross on the site that said “the truth will come out about how you died”. Kind of creepy to me!

So the good out ways the bad and I’d love to go visit again.





65-foot fishing vessel Shenandoah

Today the family went to the Harbor History Museum at 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor. I hadn’t even realized that they had built it, but its been there for a couple of years now. It’s really a nice museum, well thought out with plenty for the kids to do and a nice variety of exhibits for everybody. I especially liked the Shenandoah, a local fishing vessel that was built in 1925. The ship is being publicly restored and will eventually be available for tours. Looking at it, I could just imagine all the stories that it could tell. http://www.gigharbormuseum.org/ShenandoahProj.html

Also of interest was the restored one room school house. There were about 30 desks, close together with the teacher’s desk in the front and the heating stove in the back.

More info on the museum can be found here.