Category Archives: Tacoma

Thinking about the proposed Tacoma Methanol Plant

 

I was standing in Fireman’s Park looking out over the Port of Tacoma wondering where the proposed methanol plant would be located. Once home I read that it is to be situated on the prior site of the Kaiser Aluminum Smelter on the Blair Waterway. So that would be on the far side of this photo, realistically out of sight. And I added the fog to the image for the drama.

This proposed plant would be the largest of its kind in the Pacific Northwest. Plants are also proposed to be located in the Port of Kalama, Washington and Port Westwood, Oregon. Tacoma’s plant could be operational as soon as 2020 and would produce 20,000 tons of Methanol daily. The Methanol would then be shipped to China.

I’m not going to offer an opinion before I know more, but I did find some interesting reading and sites.

I personally think we should all quickly study this issue and act accordingly. Our voices should be heard. To that end, there is a public meeting this Wednesday and it should be well worthwhile.

While I was there I photographed the classic mountain framed in the Murry Morgan Bridge and a lovely tree.

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Black Sabbath at the Tacoma Dome

image2There I was driving around downtown Tacoma, looking for something to photograph. I was surprised at just how busy downtown was and while there were several photo worthy places, there was no ready parking. Discouraged I started home going past the Tacoma Dome since Pacific Avenue is still closed. I turned right into a traffic jam with a sea of people dressed in black. It was mostly folks in their 50s and 60s, some of which had kids (grandkids?!) with them. I was even more curious when I notice a small but serious group protesting. “Jesus said go and sin no more.” Once home, Siri informed me that Black Sabbath was playing their “The End” tour in Tacoma tonight. Oh that explains it. Black Sabbath is an English heavy metal band that was formed i n1968 (which explains the age of those attending). Since I was snapping photos out of my car window, I’m including “Washingtonia Domus” , the palm tree art just up the hill from the Dome.

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Little Free Library 24274 in Tacoma

imageThis Little Free Library is located in the 1400 block of Prospect Street in Tacoma and is part of the Little Free Library Project. This Little Free is unusual in that it is made of legos including lego figurines. There is a scene on the top and a small lego figurine living unit on the side. Inside their are books for children.

Little Free Libraries is part of a community movement which offers free books. When I considered my first Little Free Library in November 2012, a Wikipedia article informed me that there were over 200 of these libraries. Per their website, there are now over 25,000!  Each of the libraries is registered and can be located by their GPS coordinates. In October 2015 the Little Free Library was honored by the Library of Congress for Creating Communities of Literacy.

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Dolce Si at Point Ruston

image Dolce Si Bakery and Gelateria  in the Point Ruston Complex opened in November 2015 and I’ve been itching to go visit.  I finally got there and altogether it was a good experience. The space is charming and the counter person was delightful. I got my pastries to go and enjoyed them at home.  It was very busy while I was there and good for them! My only tiny wondering is why they didn’t have a pitcher of 1/2 and 1/2 for customers to doctor their to-go coffee. Instead they had flavored coffee creamers, which to me didn’t fit with the otherwise classy feeling of the place.  I’m sure Ill be back to checkout additional pastries and some of the house made Gelato.  The local newspaper, the News Tribune recently said that Dolce Si was one of the best restaurants to open in 2015.

More information can be found here.

Right near by Dolce Si I would some darling otter sculptures. The single one is right outside the cafe and the mother/child is in the traffic circle.

 

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Hip Hop, Point Ruston

imageIt was a lovely day to start the new year and dear husband and I went to check out the ever developing Point Ruston. Hip Hop is a recently installed sculpture. The piece was created by Georgia Gerber. and her blog entry can be found here.  Ms. Gerber also created The Gardner in Woodenville and Rachel the Pig at Pike Place Market.  Mt. Rainier was out in her full glory!

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Little Free Library #13705 Tacoma


This Little Free Library is located at 4339 Tacoma Avenue South, Tacoma and is part of the Little Free Library Project. This Little Free Library has two parts, a children’s box and an adult box, one on each side of the gate to the house. It seems like I always have read at least one title, but not this time. Though I have read several of the authors: Janet Evanovich, Sue Grafton, Mary Dahem and even one Nora Roberts! There are even some little toys for the kids in the children’s box. Also of note is the whimsical found art that is atop of each of the fence posts.

Little Free Libraries is part of a community movement which offers free books. When I considered my first Little Free Library in November 2012, a Wikipedia article informed me that there were over 200 of these libraries. Per their website, there are now over 25,000!  Each of the libraries is registered and can be located by their GPS coordinates.

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Jellies at Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium

imageSqueezing in a little last bite of summer, a bunch of us went to to the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium  to visit the jellies and the big cats. It was such a treat because one of the group of our happy group actually volunteers at the zoo and was able to tell us about the animals. I was so busy chatting with my friends, that I forgot to take many photos! Perhaps the dearest of the exhibits was the cloud leopards cubs even though they just slept there in a big pile of darlingness.

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The Dahlia Trial Gardens at Point Defiance

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When I think of large displays of dahlias I usually think of the Connell’s Dahlia or perhaps the Washington State Fair. But Point Defiance Park also has a large display, the Dahlia Trial Gardens, which is right next door to the Rose Gardens and everything seemed to be in bloom!  I had gone to join my good friends at a picnic and really enjoyed my time with them. Afterwards I wandered all the gardens, enjoying the sunshine and snapping away. This Dahlia Trial Garden is one of eight in the entire United States that is sanctioned by the American Dahlia Society. It is managed by the Washington State Dahlia Society. Post Defiance has an excellent article on the gardens.

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Tacoma Cemetery Living History Tour

imageOnce a year, the Tacoma Historical Society, Tacoma Cemetery and the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum join forces to produce a Living History Tour.  Each historical reenactor is from the Fort Nisqually Time Travelers and has assumed the role of a Tacoma citizen in the time period around World War I.  This is the 7th tour and the first that I remember that photography was allowed as long as we waited until the end of each talk and didn’t bother the actors.

The list of those represented is here. Thanks to Tacoma Weekly!

  • Alexander Baillie (with the golf club)-  the founder of Tacoma Country & Golf Club. It isn’t often you actually see a twinkle in somebody’s eye! I loved the story about how he imported golf clubs from his beloved Scotland. When the port didn’t know what they were, he convinced the port officials that they were farming equipment so he had less of a tax burden.
  • Annie Brown (white dress) – Annie and Oscar were the lighthouse keepers at Brown’s Point for many years. When she teared up talking about how she missed the lighthouse in her old age, I sniffed a little myself.
  • Ada Bel Tutton Gifford (red dress) had a great hat, as she should since she owned a millinery shop on Broadway Avenue. I loved her pride in her accomplishments.
  • Chester Thorne (arms to side), owner of Thornwood Castle and accomplished local businessman. He owned a yacht name the El Primero and President Taft was one of his more famous guests on it. He lost the yacht in a poker game.
  • Peter Wallerich (hands folded in front), told some of his story in rhyme. He was responsible for the automotive industry situating on South Tacoma Way and bought the Northern Pacific Bank.
  • Hugh and Mildred Wallace (couple) each told their stories of being part of high society. He was the ambassador to France and the French often honored him. She was the much loved daughter of a Chief Justice. They donated the clock tower chimes in Old City Hall to honor their daughter who died. Note to self, their house is still standing at 402 North J.
  • W.F. Sheard (with chair) has a shop across the street from the Tacoma Hotel and was well known for his furs. He is also known for designing the gold bead sight used on Winchester rifles and for bringing the totem pole in Firemen’s Park to Tacoma.

I believe the tour is full for today, but you can contact the Tacoma Historical Society to double check. And make a note to go next year :)

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Little Free Library #7684, Tacoma

imageThis Little Free Library is located at 3815 South Ainsworth Avenue, south of South 38th Street and is part of the Little Free Library Project. This high quality Little Free Library has a lovely varnished wood with details including side windows and a sun. There is a little walk up area also. Inside there are over a dozen books, with an emphasis on good quality children’s chapter books. For the first time, I found a book I actually wanted, Tacoma-Pierce Co Walking Guide.

Little Free Libraries is part of a community movement which offers free books. When I considered my first Little Free Library in November 2012, a Wikipedia article informed me that there were over 200 of these libraries. Per their website, there are now over 25,000!  Each of the libraries is registered and can be located by their GPS coordinates.

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