Tag Archives: burial

Western State Hospital Historical Cemetery

IMG_3666Western State Hospital is the largest psychiatric hospital west of the Mississippi and is located on Steilacoom Boulevard in Lakewood, WA. It was originally named Fort Steilacoom Asylum when it opened in 1871 at the site of an army post. More than 3,000 patients are buried at the Western State Hospital State Historic Cemetery though not all of them have grave markers with their name and dates on it. Some have a small, concrete numbered block as a marker, which was originally considered proper because of the stigma of mental health concerns. The cemetery, which is located on the grounds of Fort Steilacoom Park (formerly former the hospital farm), ceased having burials in 1953. The Grave Concerns Association is a volunteer organization dedicated to the restoration of the cemetery.

Benjamin Hooper was one of the earliest burials. Benjamin (1792-1891) was the first patient admitted to the Western Territories Asylum for the Insane on 8/19/1871.

And a shout out to Shelley, who had the brilliant idea to go visit and was bold enough to drive all over Western State Hospital grounds looking for the cemetery (that was on the other side of the road!). I can hardly wait until we go to the Western State Hospital Museum!

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Stonehenge

IMG_2549Stonehenge had also been on my bucket list and I was so pleased to hear this world heritage site was part of this year’s tour. It was a little more of a production than I expected with the parking area being some distance from the site. But the folks that run it do provide transportation.

Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument that originated between 2000 and 3000 BC and because of the age of the monument, there is a great deal of mystery. I did learn that:

  • It is a burial site
  • The Druids would hold ceremonies here
  • For the most part, the public is no longer aloud to walk up to the stones
  • That over the years the stones have been straightened when in danger of falling over
  • The visitor’s center opened in December 2013 and I could have happily spent more time there
  • According to some myths, the stone were healing rocks

Here is a short BBC video on this history of Stonehenge and here is the official visitors webpage.

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Chief Sealth’s (Seattle) Grave

 

13551673333_79569e9b49_b Chief Seattle’s grave site is located at 7076 NE South Street, Suquamish, in the Suquamish Tribal Cemetary just behind St. Peter’s Catholic Mission and north of Bainbridge Island. While we were there, several small groups came to pay their respects and some have left tokens, mostly shells, but also some art and coins. To either side of the headstone are tall, painted carvings. He was buried here in 1866 and the headstone was put into place in 1890. It is obviously from other photos on the internet, that the grave site has recently been improved.

Chief Sealth was born in 1786 and was a Chief of the Suquamish Tribe. TheĀ  city of Seattle was named after him.

Saint Peter’s Catholic Church was built in 1902, replacing an older church. The windows of the current church were taken out of the original church.

More about the site can be found here.

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