Tag Archives: Seattle

Hing Hay Park, Seattle

11765614935_c04a82fe90_bHing Hay Park at 423 Maynard Ave S. is a vital part of Seattle’s International District. The name translates to “Park for Pleasurable Gatherings”. The pagoda, or Grand Pavilion, was constructed in Taipei, Taiwan in 1974. The mural facing the park shows an elaborate dragon. When I visited there was a group of men playing chess on the over-sized chess board and others were playing ping pong.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

 

Giant Shoe Museum, Seattle

Giant ShoeHow could I have lived here all this time and not have known that Seattle had the World Famous Giant Shoe Museum! It’s in the lower level of the Pike Place Market and the photo shows all of it. For $1.00 in quarters one can see the entire exhibit. The stool on the left cost $.50 and the two in the middle cost $0.25 each and the one on the right explains the museum ad is free. The museum was built in 1997 by Sven Sundbaum and is next to Old Seattle Paperworks. One of the windows features the size 37 shoes of the world’s tallest man, Robert Wadlow. That is him on the mural in his real height of 8’11.1″. Robert Wadlow died at the age of 22 after complications from blister. 40,000 people attended his funeral. When I stand next to him, the top of my head is in the middle of the W of his last name. 11485114596_27375cfbf6_b

International Fountain, Seattle Center

9766904706_41858f4dd7_hThe International Fountain is situated in the middle of the Seattle Center and shots of music in time with music. I remember taking my dear daughter there was she was just little, two or three and she would chase the water spray and the pigeons too! I was there today and I’m glad to write that there are still young children (and some older ones!) playing in the fountain. Originally it was built as part of the 1962 World’s Fair, but in 1995 it was replaced and expanded. More information can be found here and a video can be found here.

Seattle Asian Art Museum

9624773113_137b2023da_bSo, as a last hurrah before school started I wanted to go to the conservatory in Volunteer Park in Seattle. Dear husband and I parked the car and first wandered over to the dahlia garden. From there we spotted Seattle’s Asian Art Museum. Oh! We’ve been meaning to go there. It is a lovely, art deco building constructed in 1933 was originally occupied by the Seattle Art Museum until 1991 when they moved into their new downtown location. The property is a designated Seattle landmark. The space is open and I really liked most of the exhibits. We never did go to conservatory! Maybe next time. The museum’s website is here.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Pho Hoang Restaurant

Photo Jul 30, 6 42 52 PM

Dear husband and I ventured up to Federal Way for a movie and grabbed a quick dinner at Pho Hoang Restaurant, 31871 Gateway Center Blvd S, Federal Way, WA. Because of time restraints, I went with the two fresh spring rolls and they were very good. The highlight of the restaurant is this wonderful wooden Seattle skyline.ย 
Photo Jul 30, 6 45 03 PM โ€Ž

Hiram M. Chittenden Locks

8608746132_b795ecaa69_z(1) It was a lovely day at theย Lake Washington Ship Canal and Hiram M. Chittenden Locks (the Ballard Locks) at 3015 NW 54th Street, Seattle, WA 98107. Dear daughter and her dear friend had one last day at their Seattle conference and I had time again to explore Seattle. I got wildly lost getting there (darned that GPS woman!) and ended up on the wrong side, but that was just fine since there was ready parking and it gave me more of a chance to stretch my legs. I went down to see the fish viewing area and saw two little bitty salmon swimming gamely along. The causeway over the spillway connects the two sides of the locks and is an invigorating, misty walk. Then on the other side is the visitor’s center and gardens. I walked on through the park to the fish and chips place right outside the gate, then with lunch in hand I returned to a sunny bench in the park for an alfresco lunch.

The ship canal was built in 1917 and connects Lake Washington, Lake Union, and Salmon Bay to the Puget Sound. While I was there, it was mostly pleasure boats. The locks were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

There is a wonderful sculpture at the locks named Salmon Waves by Paul Sorey.

8607618023_5aa3dfe525_z 8608744972_d6ce528887_z 8607613749_e57cccbf0d_z 8607631405_7b8b738df0_b

International Children’s Park, Seattle

8511100315_b8b798eee4_z 8512214354_3bc4cc6a7d_z 8512213550_25bfd65199_z 8511097155_31731e6fce_zDear daughter wanted to go to Seattle’s International District for her birthday this weekend and we wandered over to the International Children’s Park to have a time playing on the dragon, playing the drums and spinning. The park is located at 700 South Lane Street and was established n 1981. The dragon, which I climbed on and successfully got off of, was created by Gerard Tsutakawa. His father was also a sculptor and he design The Lily Statue in Lakewood.

I was delighted to see that the cherry trees in the park had begun to blossom!

What Seattle Icon Do You Remember at MOHAI?

8479952465_a9bb34b5f6_z 8479951447_d270dcb604_z 8480452196_65da898ce7_z

Seattle’s Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI), 860 Terry Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 in Lake Union Park.

It is impossible to walk around the new Museum of History and Industry without remembering something or learning something new. It is like a trip down memory lane! I went with a group and had lunch and heard a lector and got to explore the museum. At first blush the museum looks lovely, but not very full. But the opposite is true. There are a bunch of areas devoted to different themes all over the building. The 4th floor shows off the wonderful view and there is even a telescope! In addition there is a gift store and a cafe. It was a great time ๐Ÿ˜€

Some of the Seattle icon’s displayed include:

  • Ivar’s Clam on a bicycle
  • The Rainier Beer sign
  • The Toe Truck
  • The very first Starbucks sign
  • A display from The Dog House (which I once ate at) and
  • The Lusty Lady sign from the place across the street from the art museum.

I was delighted by the musical presentation on the Great Seattle Fire of 1889. The museum is next to Seattle’s Wooden Boat Center, which is free and had the Foss Tugboat available for touring. The ship below wasn’t open when I went by, but I thought the light was lovely.

One of the best finds of the day was the parking lot, which is just on the other side of the trolly tracks. For $2 I could park for up to 9 hours! And while I didn’t do it this time, next time I might just take the trolly off somewhere!

American Library Association@Seattle

ALA

The Theme of the ALA Midwinter is “The conversation starts here”. ALA takes place this weekend in the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. I went up for the day to visit the zillion vendors (more or less) The first person I ran into was somebody that I know! Really there were a bunch of friends there and one long time Facebook, AAUW friend that I got to meet face to face ๐Ÿ™‚ And while there were a plethora of phones and tablets, there was also a great deal of discussion. And the vendors were friendly and had excellent freebies! I was particularly interested in learning that Gaylord was promoting Little Free Libraries “Libraries Big & Small We <3 Them All!” I put my name in to win a premade little library structure. While there I also snapped a photo of some of the art, the view and the ALA poster that my daughter (via phone) insisted I purchase.

 

Hat ‘n Boots, Georgetown

The way cool Hat ‘n Boots Roadside American Art is located in Oxbow Park in the Georgetown Neighborhood of Seattle. Oxbow Park was created in 2003 and at the end of that month, Hat ‘n Boots were installed there. The art was fully installed by the middle of 2005. The art was originally part of a cowboy themed gas station, “Premium Tex”, that was built in 1954. The hat was over the gas station office and the boots were the restrooms (black for the guys and blue for the girls). The station closed in 1988 and fell into disrepair.

The park also includes a community garden, a children’s play area, some nice artistic touches and grassy picnic areas. It was pretty busy on this cold and foggy Saturday.

georgetownUpdate 2/13 there is a model of the Hat ‘N Boots at Seattle’s Museum of History and Industry. Hat & Boots